It's more than just money. Collective impact is a longer-term focus on moving the needle on community change. How do you sustain the energy, outcomes, human and financial resources to get to impact?

This online training will explore different strategies that can be employed from the onset to move the collective effort forward and gain momentum as you go.

Sustaining Collective Impact

Date: Monday, November 13, 2017
Time: 2:00pm - 3:30pm ET
Cost: $60

Register for this online training.


Can't make the time? If you are not able to join the session live, registering will also include the recording after the event.


TRAINING LEAD

Liz Weaver, Vice President and Director of Operations, Tamarack Institute


ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Liz Weaver

Liz is Tamarack’s Vice President and Director of Operations. In this role she provides strategic direction to the organization and leads many of its key learning activities including collective impact capacity building services for the Ontario Trillium Foundation. She is one of Tamarack's highly regarded trainers and has developed and delivered curriculum on a variety of workshop topics including collaborative governance, leadership, collective impact, community innovation, influencing policy change, and social media for impact and engagement.

Prior to this role, Liz led the Vibrant Communities Canada team and assisted place-based collaborative tables to develop their frameworks of change, supported and guided their projects, and helped connect them to Vibrant Communities and other comprehensive community collaborations.

Liz was the director for the Hamilton Roundtable on Poverty Reduction, which was recognized with the Canadian Urban Institute's David Crombie Leadership Award in 2009 and was a collective impact initiative. In her career, Liz has held leadership positions with YWCA Hamilton, Volunteer Hamilton, and Volunteer Canada. In 2002, Liz completed a Masters of Management for National Voluntary Sector Leaders through McGill University. Liz was awarded a Queen's Jubilee Medal in 2002 for her leadership in the voluntary sector, was an Athena Award finalist, and in 2004 was awarded the Women in in the Workplace award from the City of Hamilton.